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City of Pasadena Updates Minimum Wage Notice

On March 14, 2016, the Pasadena City Council adopted a minimum wage ordinance that took effect on July 1, 2016 for employers with 26 or more employees, and will take effect on July 1, 2017 for employers with 25 or fewer employees. On July 1, 2017, the required hourly wage will be as follows:

  • $12 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees.
  • $10.50 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

The city updated its minimum wage official notice to reflect these July wages. This notice must be posted where employees can easily read it. Failure to post this notice subjects employers to penalties.

See the notice

Santa Monica Minimum Wage Poster Updated

The City of Santa Monica updated its minimum wage poster to reflect the city’s minimum wage increase on July 1, 2017 to the following:

  • $12 for businesses with 26 or more employees.
  • $10.50 for businesses with 25 or fewer employees.
  • $15.66 for all hotels.

The rate effective date is July 1, 2017.

See the poster

San Francisco Updates Minimum Wage Poster

On July 1, 2017, the City and County of San Francisco’s required minimum wage increases to $14 per hour. The San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement updated its minimum wage notice to reflect this wage increase, and the notice must be posted in the workplace where employees can easily read it. Failure to post may result in penalties.

See the poster

Updated Temporary Total Disability Rates

On June 20, 2017, the California Department of Industrial Relations announced the temporary total disability (TTD) rates will increase for 2018. The minimum TTD rate will increase from $175.88 to $182.29 and the maximum TTD rate will increase from $1,172.57 to $1215.27 per week.

Read the press release

Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Finds Public Employers with Less than 20 Employees are Covered by ADEA

On June 19, 2017, in Guido v. Mount Lemon Fire District, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) applies to all state employers, regardless of size. Specifically, the court held, “that a political subdivision of a State need not have twenty or more employees to qualify as an employer subject to the requirements of the ADEA.”

The ADEA prohibits employment discrimination against persons 40 years of age or older and applies to all private employers with 20 or more employees. The law also applies to public employers. This decision is newsworthy because the courts are split as to whether the “20 or more employees” threshold is applicable to public employers. According to the Ninth Circuit, the threshold is not required for the law to be applicable to public employers. Thus, this decision is now a binding precedent for public employers within the Ninth Circuit, which includes Alaska, Arizona, California, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.

Read the opinion